Training for the NYC Marathon

On the morning or October 16, 2011 I went out for my long run of  the week, in preparation for the New York City Marathon on November 6.   It was to be 18 miles, and should have taken me about 2 1/2 hours.  I went to bed early, hydrated and take a couple of  Advil to reduce any inflammation and soreness.  Still, this morning, my body did not feel like going outside.  So, instead of leaving the house at 6, I dragged myself out at 7:30.  San Francisco was hosting the Nike Womens’ Marathon this morning, which was running along my usual path along the Embarcadero toward the Golden Gate Bridge.  I decided I wanted a more solitary run, so I went in the opposite direction,  south along third street, and toward SFO.  Almost right from the start, I felt heavy and slow.  The run was rolling up and down hills, and after a couple miles I got into a pattern, although it was slow, and my breathing erratic.  I made it to 8 miles, and decided to walk and get some Gatorade at a gas station in South City.  By the time I got to the station, I knew that I could not go another mile forward, and certainly couldn’t make it back.  I asked the attendant at the gas station if there was a pay phone, as I wanted to call my partner and ask him to take me home.  There was no pay phone, but she would let me use the store phone.  I left a message for Thomas, and within 2 minutes, he was calling me back. He was going south to San Mateo for his weekly tennis lessons, and would come around and pick me up, and I could watch him in his tennis lesson.  I was grateful to have a ride, and I guess I would just say that some days are harder than the next, and not to get upset or depressed about it, but be happy for the chance to be able to run.

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The Unvarnished Truth About Sugar

Do you know that sugar, or some form of sugar, is an ingredient in many of the processed foods we buy from our supermarkets?

Did you know that in the past 114 years, the use of sugar rose from 5 to 155 pounds a year per person?

Many doctors and researchers agree that the regular consumption of commercially processed foods is the primary cause of adult-onset diabetes.  Processing takes a lot of the nutrients out of otherwise nutrient-rich foods. To make up for the loss of nutrients during processing, synthetic vitamins and minerals are added. So we lose out on the natural enzymes and nutrients these foods would normally contain. The most prevalent form of refined carbohydrate in the average American diet is refined sugar, which includes not only table sugar, but also sucrose, fructose, glucose, dextrose, and corn syrup, all of which are common food additives in processed foods. Processed foods also contain hydrogenated oils, artificial flavors, artificial colors and food dyes, BHT (preservative), shellac, extra salt, sulfites, sodium benzoate, artificial sweeteners (aspartame), pesticides, hormones and antibiotic residues in animal foods. These ingredients are not good for your health.

Dandelion Greens are Great

I got some dandelion greens in my weekly CSA box, and came across this posting about uses and benefits.  If you have any other ideas or suggestions, let me know.

http://www.incrediblesmoothies.com/green-smoothies/10-reasons-you-should-use-dandelion-greens-in-your-green-smoothie/